Could Botox stop teeth grinding? A teeth-clenching study

Posted 18 Feb, 2018
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Botox — formally known as onabotulinum toxin-A — is an injectable drug that can prevent muscles from contracting. The drug is best known for its cosmetic use; it can be delivered to the facial muscles — mainly those between the eyebrows and around the eyes — to temporarily reduce the appearance of frown lines and crow’s feet.

Botox may also be used for a number of medical conditions, including migraine, overactive bladder, and muscle stiffness. Could bruxism be added to the list?

The new study — recently published in the journal Neurology — attempted to answer this question.

Notably, the study included just 22 people with bruxism – not exactly a huge sample. Participants spent a night in a laboratory, where the researchers monitored their teeth grinding and clenching.

The next day, 13 of the subjects were randomized to receive Botox, while the others were given a placebo injection. Injections were administered to the temporal and masseter muscles, which we use for chewing.

Around 4–8 weeks later, subjects were asked to spend another night in the laboratory, and the researchers reassessed their bruxism symptoms.

Please click the link below to read further:

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/320666.php

At Pain spa Dr. Krishna has been offering the above treatment for a number of years now. Please click the link below to read more about this treatment on our website: 

Botox for TMJ Dysfunction

Have a question? Or would like to book in with us?

Get in Touch

Common Conditions
that we Treat Everyday

View All Conditions

Latest from the Blog

Posted 18 Feb, 2018

Could Botox stop teeth grinding? A teeth-clenching study

Botox — formally known as onabotulinum toxin-A — is an injectable drug that can prevent muscles from contracting. The drug is best known for its cosmetic use; it can be delivered to the facial muscles — mainly those between the eyebrows and around the eyes — to temporarily reduce the appearance of frown lines and crow...
Posted 18 Feb, 2018

One-off, 10-minute treatment ‘cures’ most lower back pain

A new ‘minimally invasive’ treatment provides long-term relief from crippling back pain, according to new research. The majority of patients in a trial were pain-free after receiving a new image-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment for lower back pain and sciatica for just 10 minutes. Lower back pain is a...
Posted 18 Feb, 2018

Minimally Invasive Treatment Provides Relief From Back Pain

The majority of patients were pain free after receiving a new image-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment for low back pain and sciatica, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). Low back pain is an extremely common problem that affects at least 80...